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So far Cody Foster has created 9 blog entries.
13 10, 2021

LAN 520 Introduction to Tibetan Buddhist Literature

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} Dates: Friday mornings September 24 - December 17, 2021, from 9am - 10:30am Pacific time. Faculty: Mark Seibold This course focuses on acquiring the knowledge and skills needed to read Buddhist literature—primarily liturgical and commentarial texts—in Tibetan. Students engage in a detailed study of Tibetan grammar from the perspective of both classical and modern analyses. Reading starts with simple phrases to build vocabulary and familiarity with common grammatical structures. As students gain experience, they gradually read increasingly long and complex passages. Students are introduced to the traditional discipline of jor-lo (sbyor klog) — “reading the

13 10, 2021

LAN 511 Intermediate Colloquial Tibetan (Semester 2)

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} Dates: Mondays and Wednesdays 6:00pm Pacific Time, September 13 - December 15, 2021 Faculty: Gerry Wiener and Nima Bhuti This course is a continuation of our Colloquial Tibetan series and is oriented toward continuing students who have had training in the Tibetan alphabet, spelling, and beginning dialogs. The emphasis of the classes is on developing further fluency with spoken Tibetan both in listening and in speaking. Students focus on training in successively more complex Tibetan colloquial dialogs. Spoken Tibetan is emphasized in class and students are encouraged to use Tibetan when asking questions as

12 10, 2021

LAN 531 Reading Tibetan Buddhist Literature (Semester 2)

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} Dates: Monday mornings September 20 - December 6, 2021, from 8:30am - 10:00 am Pacific time. Faculty: Mark Seibold This course is oriented towards reading Tibetan Buddhist texts and literature. It uses Tokmé Zangbo’s famous 37 Practices of a Bodhisattva (རྒྱལ་སྲེཨ་ལག་ལེན་སོ་བདུན་མ།) as the basis for developing familiarity with Tibetan grammar and developing reading skills. Interesting and important grammatical points are explained in the context of specific passages. Opening and closing chants are done in Tibetan. Students are encouraged to practice reading aloud to learn the rhythms and feel of the phrasing of the language

12 10, 2021

BUD 702 Madhyamakāvatāra III: Entrance to the Middle Way (Part I)

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} This course is a continuation of the in-depth study of Chandrakīrti’s Madhyamakāvatāra based on the commentary by the Eight Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje (1507-1554). Students complete the bulk of the sixth chapter on the pāramitā of prajñā. The topics covered include a detailed refutation of the proponents of consciousness and an extensive presentation of personal selflessness. It will cover Chapter 6 on Prajñā: 1) Refutation of the Chittamatra, 2) Completion of the Refutation of Production from Both Self and Other and From Neither and 3) The Presentation of Relative Production as a Dependent-Arising (Verses 6.48-6.119)

12 10, 2021

BUD 610 Madhyamaka Philosophical Tradition: Not Even a Middle

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} This course is an exposition of the Middle Way philosophical tradition based on Part One of The Center of the Sunlit Sky, expressed as the ground, path and fruition of Madhyamaka. Students explore the classification of knowable objects into the two realities and cultivate certainty in the view of emptiness of all phenomena, formulating the five great Madhyamaka reasonings. The course includes the presentation of personal identitylessness with the sevenfold analysis of the chariot. Faculty: Jirka Hladiš Dates: Tuesdays and Thursdays, October 26–December 23, 2021, 4:30–6:00p Pacific time. (No class on Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 25, 2021) Prerequisites: BUD 501, BUD

12 10, 2021

BUD 554 Debate II

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} This course continues the methodical training in elementary debate skills on the basis of the Collected Topics Debate I course. Students learn how to challenge the second mode, study the debate strategies of the challenger and the defender and how to bring a debate to completion. The debate content consists of the classification of objects in terms of entity and the classification of mind into primary minds and mental events.Faculty: Jirka Hladiš and Alison McKeeDates & Time: Mondays, September 13–December 13, 2021, 5:00–6:30p Pacific timePrerequisite: This course is open only to students who have completed the Spring 2021 Debate I

12 10, 2021

BUD 520 Mind & Its World III: Vaibhashika Philosophical Tradition

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} This course is an exposition of the Vaibhashika philosophical tradition, based on The Gateway that Reveals the Philosophical Traditions to Fresh Minds root text. Students explore foundational classifications of knowable objects: the five bases, five aggregates, twelve sources and eighteen constituents, followed by the presentation of the Vaibhaṣika theory of causation from Collected Topics and the twelve links of dependent origination. Faculty: Francis Sullivan Dates and Time: Sundays, September 26 – December 19, 2021, 7:30am – 9:00am Pacific time Prerequisite: BUD501 Required texts: Root text: The Gateway that Reveals the Philosophical Traditions to Fresh Minds (Truptha), by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, Acharya

12 10, 2021

BUD 502 Clear Thinking

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} This course is an introductory exposition of knowable objects drawn from the Abhidhama tradition, based on Collected Topics root text. Students learn methods for thinking clearly by formulating definitions, examples, equivalents and classifications, and by exploring the four types of logical relationships between two phenomena. Faculty: Dr. Phil Stanley Dates and Time: Mondays September 13 – October 25, 6pm – 7:30pm Pacific time Prerequisite: None Required Texts: Root text: Collected Topics (Düdra), by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen, Nitartha Institute Publications Clear Thinking Workbook, Nitartha Institute Publications Cost: ${!{types field='course-cost'}!}{!{/types}!}

12 10, 2021

LAN 501 Beginning Colloquial Tibetan

{!{types field='course-start-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!}-{!{types field='course-end-date' style='text' format='F j, Y'}!}{!{/types}!} Dates: Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:00pm Pacific Time, September 14 – December 16, 2021 Faculty: Gerry Wiener and Nima Bhuti This course is the continuation of Beginning Colloquial Tibetan (LAN 500). It is oriented toward students who have had some training in the Tibetan alphabet, spelling, and beginning dialogs. The emphasis of the classes is on developing fluency with spoken Tibetan. Students focus on training in successively more complex Tibetan colloquial dialogs. The class covers the material in the first three to four chapters of The Heart of Tibetan Language by Franziska Oertle. Supplementary material is also provided, including

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